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Historical Sampler – SnowDrop IV; and Pearls and Roses I

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5 January 2009

Historical Sampler – SnowDrop IV; and Pearls and Roses I

Um, there has been a slight accident involving a cat, a glass of cordial and my camera power pack.

Until some batteries arrive, I shall be photograph-less. I’ve done my best to provide lots of pretty pictures all the same.

-------------------------
I've finished the snowdrop. :-)

It's outlined in silver passing, has a red centre in satin stitch, then 5 lines of Lurex over the red meeting at the centre.

-------------------

The next section I’m working on is shown below.

pearl_feature_7

It is largely inspired by Madonna Contessa Ilaria Veltri degli Ansari’s Embroidered Elizabethan Gloves, shown at

http://ilaria.veltri.tripod.com/gloves.html

Here’s a close-up of the relevant bit:

pearl_feature_6

I’m using the idea of

  • pearls for sepals for the rose
  • pearls inside looped Purl (she used Bullion) for the buds.

Looping purl is described in A-Z of Goldwork by Country Bumpkin. (page 95)

My rose looks more like a classic Tudor Rose. The picture below shows a double rose (two layers of petals) whereas I’m doing a single (DogRose).

pearl_feature_4

(page 43, The Embroiderer’s Flowers, Thomasina Beck)

Here’s one done in goldwork, from Goldwork Embroidery by Mary Brown (page 25)

pearl_feature_3

(spider web stitches form the second layer of petals in this one)

I know I’ve seen DogRosees done in thread for the main part of the petals, and then the ‘foldover’ at the edges done in purl, but I can’t find any pictures. They are hiding from me.

My design plan for my Rose is :

pearl_feature_5

I’m up to the final step – adding the purl pearl around the edges of each overlap.

The petals were done in three shades of pink.

I made a false start with the buttonholing. I needed to start from the middle – it’s a little hard to buttonhole from a curved edge and be decreasing stitches. Not impossible – but certainly simpler to start from the other end.

I found that when I reached the curved edge that I didn’t necessarily need a Return thread for my buttonholing – it sometimes stretched over the inner curve of the overlap on some petals, so I just did Detached Buttonhole (no Return).

I had some adventures with deciding what to cover the overlaps with.

  • I first tried Rough Purl laid vertically to the petals. However, I’d still be there until next Christmas adding purl lengths if I kept doing that. From memory, this is how it is usually done, and I can only admire the embroiderers that have the patience. I would have needed at least 10 lengths per overlap. At least 50 lengths to cut and place? Ouch.
  • I tried doing Pearl Purl following around each overlap, to follow the curve of the flower – but it just looked wrong because I’ve never seen one done like that.
  • I tried using Broad Plate, with the idea of bending the edges into the curved shape of the overlap, but I couldn’t get the end of the Plate to secure itself (I’ve had this problem before) so I gave up on that idea.

I ended up using Lurex in straight stitch, and it looks fine.

Adding the Pearl Purl to edge the overlap is giving it a good finished and well defined look.

---

I will also do some buds, of pearl purl with pearls in the middle as Ilaria did.

Also as part of the design, I’m going to feature a similiar flower :

pearl_feature

http://tinyurl.com/5hqbz3

This link leads to the home page of Historical Needlework Resources, 16th C. I’ve had a look through most of the links and can’t find where this image specifically came from.

Edit 25th Feb : This is the Italian States/NeedleCase/Venice/More Detail. The original image is

That looks like more Pearl Purl, as far as I can tell.

-----

I have a couple of comments to make :

Passing Thread, if thin enough, can be used to embroider with (several books say this – Zimmerman’s Metal Thread book comes to mind).

But it’s a complete agony to get it through the ground. A needle grabber is needed.

Maybe my passing thread is a bit too thick?

Lurex is much much easier to deal with, but it tends to crack and show the inner silk core under the tension of a curve. That can be clearly seen on the Ladder Stitch coming from the red dogrose that I did very early on.

I’m getting some Papillion, and will have a play with that. I’m at the stage where I can do a bit of the vine up around the strawberries.

Another option is Benson and Johnson 371.

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2 Comments:

Blogger The Chilly Hollow Needlepoint Adventure said...

Rose, Mary Corbet's blog mentioned sales going on. Look at the Hedgehog link. They have Gylte Sylke Twist on sale for $16+ which works out to over $26 for me with shipping as they are in Australia but it may be cheaper for you. I thought of this while you mentioned various threads you were trying on the newest pearl rose. I love pink and roses. Can't wait to see it.

Here's the link.
http://www.needlenthread.com/2009/01/needlework-sales.html

Monday, January 05, 2009  
Blogger Elmsley Rose said...

Thankyou sweetie.

I'm a regular reader of Mary's. :-) She's actually provided a huge amount of off-line help in getting me started, especially with the needlepaintings I've done.

GST - I've got the (original) green. I'm finding it hard to justify the cost of another when I'm on a pension, especially since the AU$ died, and when I want silks and own exactly 6 skeins (Sol D'Algier in Creme, and 5 x3 yards of Splendors Filament). (I've decided YLI is rubbish as silk)

The green is good because I can use it in leaves/calyxes and therefore all over the place.

But you were right - if I did, I'd get the carnacion!

Tuesday, January 06, 2009  

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